Massage Therapy FAQ

What should I expect during my first massage therapy visit?


Your massage therapist may require you to fill out a health history form. Afterward the therapist will begin by asking you general questions to establish what areas you would like worked on, if there are any conditions needing to be addressed, and to determine if massage is appropriate for you. Your massage therapist may perform certain assessments and testing to evaluate your condition and to see if you have any presenting complaints.

It is important to list all health concerns and medications so the therapist can adapt the session to your specific needs without doing any harm.




Will the massage hurt?


This depends on the type of massage and the depth of the strokes. A light, relaxing massage that doesn't probe very deep into the muscles, shouldn't hurt. With that being said, there is a 'feels good' hurt and an 'ouch, stop it' hurt. A good massage, even a really deep tissue massage, should always stay in the 'feels good' hurt range.

Pain can be an indication that the muscle is possibly injured or inflamed and pressure should be adjusted. Also, pain can cause you to tighten up and negate the relaxing effects of the massage. The most effective and deepest massage always works with your body's natural response, not against it.




Do I have to be completely undressed?


You should undress to the level you are comfortable. For a full body massage, some get completely undressed. However, if you will be more comfortable during the session if you leave your underwear on, that's fine. The therapist will work around the clothes you left on as best as he/she can. If removing all your clothes makes you too nervous and unable to relax, then you are not getting the optimal benefit from the session.

Your massage therapist will give you privacy to undress and get comfortable on the table.




How many sessions will I need?


Honestly, its hard to say. Every person is unique and every condition is unique to each person. It may take one session or it may take several. You and your therapist will be able to talk more specifically about this after your first session and he/she has had a chance to evaluate your body's tissues.




Do I have to listen to whale calls or flutes during my massage?


No. (Not that there's anything wrong with that.) While many therapists play slower, quieter music you can choose to have different music or no music at all. Studies have shown that music at under 60 beats-per-minute has a calming, relaxing effect on the body and therefore can enhance your experience. However, while this may be true, we do understand that you may not want to listen to whale calls or flutes. Please let us know if this a concern and we will be happy to work with you on other available music options.